Red Raspberry Research Abounds at 2016 Experimental Biology Conference

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Six New Studies Point to Red Raspberry’s Potential Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Role in Cardiovascular, Blood Glucose and Liver Function

SAN DIEGO, CA – A flurry of new research on red raspberries is set to be presented this week at the 2016 Experimental Biology conference in San Diego. Initial findings from six animal model studies reveal the potential effects of red raspberry consumption on cardiovascular disease risk reduction, maintaining normal blood glucose levels and liver function as well as potential anti-inflammatory effects related to bone health.

Recently, the January issue of Advances in Nutrition published a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature on the potential role of red raspberries in helping to reduce the risk of metabolically-based chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and Alzheimer’s disease: all of which share critical metabolic, oxidative and inflammatory links.

“The new research being presented at Experimental Biology contributes to the growing body of nutrition research around the potential role of red raspberries in helping to reduce the risk factors associated with metabolically-based chronic diseases,” said Tom Krugman, Executive Director of the National Processed Raspberry Council. “While further research in humans is needed, these animal studies provide important insights that will drive future research.”

Red raspberries contribute a number of valuable essential nutrients, including providing an excellent source of vitamin C and nine grams of fiber per cup. They are also among the few plant foods that provide a source of ellagitannins and anthocyanins in the same package. While in vitro and animal studies suggests that these phytochemicals may help to reduce risk for some chronic diseases, additional research is needed to test similar hypotheses and possible effects in human metabolism.

Animal and in vitro (cell) research on red raspberries being presented at Experimental Biology includes:

Cardiovascular

Dr. Ara Kirakosyan of the University of Michigan investigated the potential effects of red raspberry intake on obesity-prone rats.

  • Kirakosvan, A., et al. Cardioprotective Effects of Red Raspberries in Obesity-prone Rats. The FASEB Journal, April 2016, vol. 30, no. 1 Supplement lb284 http://tinyurl.com/zht8d5j

Metabolic Syndrome

Dr. Neil Shay and colleagues from the Food Science and Technology department of Oregon State University, studied the effects of red raspberries in mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar Western diet.

  • Shay, N.F., et al. Intake of Whole Raspberries and the Raspberry Phytochemicals, Ellagic Acid and Raspberry Ketone Reduces Adiposity, Improves Glucose Control and Changes Hepatic Gene Expression Profiles in High-fat Fed Mice. The FASEB Journal, April 2016, vol. 30 no. 1 Supplement 692.6 http://tinyurl.com/hs44hsb

Dr. Mei-Jun Zhu and colleagues at Washington State University looked at the potential effect of red raspberry consumption on metabolic syndrome in male mice with diet-induced obesity.

  • Zhu, M.J., et al. Dietary raspberries ameliorate metabolic syndromes in diet-induced obese mice. The FASEB Journal, April 2016 vol. 30 no. 1 Supplement 907.21 http://tinyurl.com/hgtav6x

Diabetes

Principal investigator Dr. Giuliana Noratto of the Department of Food and Nutrition Science at Texas A&M University studied the effects of red raspberry consumption on diabetes-related complications and heart disease in obese diabetic mice.

  • Noratto, G., et al. Effects of Raspberry Dietary Supplementation on Risk Biomarkers of Diabetes Related Complications and Heart Disease in Diabetic Mice The FASEB Journal, April 2016, vol. 30 no. 1 Supplement 692.23 http://tinyurl.com/jcrq5pr

Liver Function

Dr. Geoff Sasaki and colleagues at Oregon State University looked at the capacity for ellagic acid quercetin to bind to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARa).

  • Sasaki, G., et al., Ellagic Acid and Quercetin are High-Affinity Ligands of Human Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha in an In-Vitro Competitive Binding Assay. The FASEB Journal, April 2016, vol. 30 no. 1 Supplement 691.7 http://tinyurl.com/jconyn7

Inflammation and Bone Health

Dr. Amber Thomas, of the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences at Texas Woman’s University and colleagues, using mouse macrophage cells, studied the anti-inflammatory effect of polyphenols in red raspberries in the production of osteoclasts, the cells associated with the breakdown of bone.

  • Thomas, A., et al. Inhibitory Effects of Red Raspberry Polyphenols on Osteoclastogenesis in RANKL-Stimulated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages. The FASEB Journal, April 2016, vol. 30 no. 1 Supplement 691.31 http://tinyurl.com/zohm4pv

In the Spotlight: Raspberries in the Media

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As a direct result of the NPRC’s marketing efforts, processed raspberries and raspberry health benefits have achieved significant media exposure over the past few months, reaching consumers and trade professionals across the U.S. Take a look at a few examples!

 

Yahoo! News: Five Reasons You Should Eat More Raspberries

 

Fitness Magazine: Surprisingly Creative Ways to Cook with Frozen Fruit

 

Dallas Morning News, Eat This Not That: How to Handle the Holidays

 

Chicago Sun Times: Festive and Flavorful Gifts

 

Meal Makeover Moms: Frozen Raspberry & Mango Smoothie Bowl for a Healthy, Fiber-Rich Breakfast or Snack

 

Orlando Family Magazine: A Very Berry Sweet Valentine’s Day

 

All Day I Dream About Food: Raspberry Chocolate-Filled Cupcakes

 

Fresh Plaza: Scientific Study Reveals Health Benefits of Red Raspberries   

 

Red Raspberry Health News

handful of raspberries600

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Research studies funded by the National Processed Raspberry Council have been published and are helping us spread the word about the health-supporting qualities of red raspberries.

 

  • Scientific Study Review Reveals Health Promoting Potential of Red Raspberries

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. These properties shed light on the potential role of red raspberries in helping to reduce the risk of metabolically-based chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and Alzheimer’s disease: all of which share critical metabolic, oxidative, inflammatory links. Read More Here

 

  • Recent Studies Shed Light on Compounds in Red Raspberries That May Reduce Certain Risk Factors

Red raspberries are naturally rich in polyphenols, and as a result of research recently published in Free Radical Biology and Medicine and The Journal of Functional Foods, scientists are now beginning to understand how and why these polyphenols may offer human health benefits.  According to researcher Dr. Alan Crozier, at the Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, “In order to further study the potential health benefits of red raspberry consumption, it is important to first understand how the body metabolizes raspberry polyphenols, and the mode of action of the bioactive compounds that underlie these potential protective effects. While current evidence is promising, additional long-term studies are needed to establish the role of berry polyphenols in the prevention of specific health conditions.” Read More Here

NPRC Launches “Farm to Freezer” Video Series With Social Media Campaign

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Over the past two years, the NPRC has produced three stunning videos that capture the essence of the processed raspberry farming community and the techniques used to bring processed raspberries to market.  We are officially rolling out these videos over a four-week social media campaign to share our story with the world.  Stay up to speed on our video launch by “liking” @redrazz on Facebook.